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Whole Life Challenge

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Butternut Apple Ginger Soup

butternut
butternut
  • 4 pounds whole butternut squash (about 2 medium), halved lengthwise and seeds removed
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter (1/4 stick)
  • 1 medium Granny Smith apple (about 8 ounces)
  • 1/2 medium yellow onion
  • 8 fresh sage leaves
  • 2 1/2 cups low-sodium vegetable or chicken broth
  • 2 1/2 cups water
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more as needed
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more as needed
  • 1/3 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup toasted pumpkin seeds, for garnish (optional)
  1. Heat the oven to 425°F and arrange a rack in the middle.
  2. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil. Place the squash pieces cut-side up on the baking sheet. Melt 1 tablespoon of the butter and brush all of it over the tops and insides of the squash halves (alternatively, you can rub it on evenly with your fingers). Season generously with salt and pepper. Roast until knife tender, about 50 minutes to 1 hour.
  3. Meanwhile, peel, core, and cut the apple into medium dice. Cut the onion into medium dice. Melt the remaining tablespoon of butter in a large saucepan or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add the apple, onion, and sage, season with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 7 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and set aside.
  4. When the squash is ready, set the baking sheet on a wire rack until the squash is cool enough to handle. Using a large spoon, scoop the flesh into the saucepan with the sautéed apples and onions; discard the skins.
  5. Add the broth, water, and measured salt and pepper, stir to combine, and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium low and simmer, stirring occasionally and breaking up any large pieces of squash, until the flavors meld, about 15 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the cream.
  6. Using a blender, purée the soup in batches until smooth, removing the small cap (the pour lid) from the blender lid and covering the space with a kitchen towel (this allows steam to escape and prevents the blender lid from popping off). Alternatively, use an immersion blender. Taste and season with salt and pepper as needed. Serve garnished with the pumpkin seeds, if using.

http://www.chow.com/recipes/30466-roasted-butternut-squash-soup

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Grain Free Nut Free Pumpkin Pancakes

pancake The world according to pumpkin facts over one billion pounds of pumpkin are produced each year in the US.  Scientifically speaking, pumpkins are a fruit (they contain seeds) but when it comes to cooking, they are often referred to as vegetables. Pumpkins are low in calories, 100 grams of pumpkin produces around 26 calories of energy. Thanksgiving is a time that I pull out all my favorite pumpkin recipes.

Pumpkins were an important food source for the pilgrims, as they stored well, which meant they would have a nutritious food source during the winter months. It is documented that pumpkins were served at the second Thanksgiving celebration. When mentally picturing an early Thanksgiving, we usually think of a Pilgrim woman in a bleached starched white apron holding a pumpkin pie with a perfectly fluted crust . The truth is in fact, quite the opposite. The Pilgrims cut the top off of a pumpkin, scooped the seeds out, and filled the cavity with cream, honey, eggs and spices. They placed the top back on and carefully buried it in the hot ashes of a cooking fire. When finished cooking, they lifted this blackened item from the earth with no pastry shell whatsoever. They scooped the contents out along with the cooked flesh of the shell like a custard. Yumm! The Pilgrims were also known to make pumpkin beer. They fermented a combination of persimmons, hops, maple sugar and pumpkin to make this early colonial brew.

I did not make pie or beer but I did create a pumpkin pancake that the kids loved! The best part is they are grain free and nut free. Double bonus!

Let's Get Started

Yields about 8 - 10 3" pancakes.

4 eggs at room temp

2 heaping TBL of pumpkin  I used this kind

1 TBL Honey

1/4 - 1/2 cup of coconut flour

1/2 tsp salt

1/2 tsp baking soda

cinnamon to taste

nutmeg to taste

ghee or coconut oil to fry your pancake

The down and dirty:

combine your eggs, pumpkin, and honey in a food processor. slowly add in your dry ingredients. You want the batter drippy enough that it comes off the spoon easily, and spreads out in your pan. If you get it to dry - add a little bit of water to thin it out. Fry up in your pan - be cautious when flipping. These were delicious with a serving of honey or maple syrup on top.

Enjoy ~

 

End of Summer Marinade

summer

I am always looking for a change up when it has to do with chicken. BBQ Chicken is by far a staple in our house.

Here is a simple sweet and savory Marinade without all the usual suspects (sugar, soy sauce, etc.)

1/4 cup Coconut Aminos

2 TBL Coconut Sugar

1 Clove Garlic Minced

1 TBL Fresh Ginger Minced

1 TSP Chili Flakes

1 TBL Sesame Oil

Large Ziplock Bag

4-6 Chicken Breasts or Large Boneless Thighs

Place all in your Ziplock Bag - Seal Tight and lie flat in your fridge for about 4 hours or over night. You can double the recipe and save half for a sauce after you have cooked your meat. You would slowly cook half the marinade in a small pot until it reduces down and thickens up...pour over your chicken.